A building once dubbed the ugliest building in Ashton-Under-Lyne, which is not famous for its Architecture, is back on the market after a failed conversion into 51 apartments that have never been occupied.

The ten-storey-high Oakglade House, formerly Crown House – is being offered for sale for a snip at £1.5m.

The monstrosity of a building property was once home the proud home of the HMRC.

Developers took it over and attempted to turn the Grey Block into a swish new apartment block and make money on the need for more plush apartments in Greater Manchester.

Two penthouse suites were added to the top of the building with their own terraces providing far reaching views across Saddleworth to the east and Manchester to the west.

 

[vc_hoverbox image=”13″ primary_title=”Before” hover_title=”Before”]Oakglade House greeted many on their way into Ashton, next to the Post Office Sorting depot it was bizarrely not even considered the ugliest Building in Ashton![/vc_hoverbox]
[vc_hoverbox image=”14″ primary_title=”After” hover_title=”After”]It was eventually painted yellow and red, with metal balconies added to both sides for individual apartments.[/vc_hoverbox]

Works began at the end of 2013 by Salford-based Stama Developments Ltd. The building, which stands on the corner of Booth Street and Fleet Street with the A635 running along the southern boundary, was eventually painted yellow and red, with metal balconies added to both sides for individual apartments.

By 2016 the apartments had come to the rental market with an office set up inside the ground floor apartment and prospective tenants touring the building to choose their favourite flat.Inside the ten floors were totally transformed into swish, brand new spacious apartments with wooden and tile flooring and fully tiled bathrooms and brand new kitchens, with many of the upper floor apartments affording spectacular views across the skyline.

However, catastrophe struck soon after with the building suddenly ‘closed down’ and locked up with notices warning the public that the building was still a building site and not to enter.

Those who did step in at the time reported widespread flooding, with walls dripping wet and wooden floors sadly warped, rising and buckled.

Now, having stood empty since the conversion, the building is being offered up for sale to prospective purchasers as a refurbishment / development opportunity.

The sales information makes it clear that significant works are still required to bring the apartments up to scratch and meet planning approvals outlined by Tameside Council’s planning department.

The opportunity is being offered by Manchester-based Roger Hannah & Co, who say they have been instructed to sell the freehold interests in the whole buildings and 50 of the 51 long leasehold (residue of 125 years) apartments. The site also provides 31 on-site car parking spaces accessed off Fleet Street. We’re hoping that Roger Hannah can turn Water into Wine, as they will need a miracle to sell off this property.

The development consists of ten studio apartments, one, one bedroom apartment; 29 two bed and 11 three bed apartments.

“The conversion was not satisfactorily completed by the original developer and has never been occupied. The property is currently vacant and works will be required to the building to bring it up to a suitable state of repair. The developer will be required to undertake a schedule of works. A high level scoping document is available.” – Roger Hannah estate agents confirmed recently to the local press.

Good Luck Roger Hannah, because even from that incredibly political statement it sounds like there’s a can of worms waiting to be opened for its new owners.

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